Grab your free preview

Alcohol​ ​And​ ​Dental​ ​Disease

Every alcoholic will probably be aware that their addiction is damaging many aspects of their lives. Personal and professional relationships may have been strained to breaking point. The emotional stress related to alcohol dependence will invariably take a significant toll on mental health. And of course consuming large amounts of alcohol may irreparably damage general health and wellbeing. There is, however, another health aspect that is usually overlooked because of more urgent medical, psychiatric and social problems but is none the less still an important part of living a long and healthy life and that is dental health.




The adverse effects of drinking heavily are well documented, alcohol gets absorbed by the stomach, enters the bloodstream and reaches the brain and central nervous system, and the remains are processed by the liver. This means that there is a risk of stomach ulcers, artery clogging, and liver cirrhosis. The effects on the brain include memory loss, impaired motor functions, and alcohol dependency.

Alcohol is the second leading cause of cancer in human beings, second only to smoking. Also, the risk of heart disease, impotence, wrinkles and early aging increases significantly with heavy alcohol consumption.

The effect on teeth is no less dangerous, as alcohol is consumed through the mouth, meaning it is the most affected organ of all, and since most alcoholic drinks contain added sodas and\or citrus drinks, the effects are multiplied.

Alcohol dental health

Oral diseases related to alcohol abuse are numerous and diverse, including:

    • Teeth staining (as they contain artificial colors and chromogenic bacteria).
    • Bad breath, as alcohol disrupts the balance of bacteria in the mouth.
    • Dryness of the mouth and as saliva is a buffer and can wash away the food remnant and plaque and clean the teeth, the risk of dental decay and gum disease increases. Not only that, but many alcohol abusers tend to skip dental care altogether, causing the damage to increase significantly.
    • Alcohol is acidic in origin, which causes demineralization and softening of the enamel (outer surface of the teeth), also leading to increased decay rate in addition to teeth sensitivity.
    • Due to this acidic nature, it causes changes in the taste sensation of the tongue, as well as burning of the tongue, gums and the insides of the cheeks.
    • Excessive use of alcohol can also lead to vomiting, and since the stomach contents are highly acidic, this causes chemical erosion of the teeth. Significant erosion leads to teeth sensitivity, decay, and bad appearance.




  • Swelling of Salivary glands, especially the Parotid gland (which is present in front of the ear. This carries a lot of risks including decreasing the flow of saliva, nerve compression (as more than 5 nerves that supply the face pass through this gland) and in severe cases, even hearing problems.
  • Alcohol dependence has also been linked to gum disease which can, in turn, lead to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke diabetes, respiratory disease, and cancer.
  • Research has shown that statistically, drinkers are more likely smoke as well. The combination of drinking alcohol and smoking is especially harmful and early research suggests that the combination of using both substances together multiplies the chance of certain cancers.
  • Oral cancer risk is multiplied 6 times with alcohol abusers compared to average risk, especially if combined with smoking.

Alcohol and dental disease

“What​ ​should​ ​I​ ​do​ ​to​ ​avoid​ ​these​ ​effects?”

Unfortunately improving dental health while still suffering from alcohol addiction is very difficult since the user will likely be facing considerable challenges emotionally, socially, physically and financially, but there are some small steps that can be taken to keep the damaging effects to a minimum.

  • Every effort should be made to attend a dentist or clinic regularly to clean the teeth professionally, check for teeth and gum infections and importantly monitor for any sign of mouth cancer.
  • Surveys and research indicate that while practically no addicts floss at all, most still make an effort to clean their teeth regularly and actively maintain an interest in oral health. Unfortunately, in many cases, the daily oral hygiene routine is not still not sufficiently adequate to prevent the buildup of plaque and the resulting decay and gum disease. Interestingly alcoholics often choose a hard bristled brush. Perhaps in an effort to thoroughly scrub away the smell of alcohol from their breath. Hard bristle brushes are not ideal for cleaning teeth as they can potentially damage teeth enamel and contribute to gum recession. A better option is to use a soft bristle brush that is better able to flex into the spaces between the teeth and that won’t damage the teeth. An even better option is to use an electric toothbrush that can reduce the effort required to clean every tooth surface properly. Dentists often recommend Oral-B toothbrushes because of the efficiency of the cup-shaped cleaning heads. Some electric toothbrushes like the Oral-B Pro-2000 have a built-in pressure sensor that will alert the user if excessive pressure is applied during brushing, this is especially useful for people who drink regularly during the day because alcohol has a softening effect on tooth enamel making them susceptible to toothbrush erosion.
  • Brushing directly after drinking is not recommended, but heavy rinsing of your mouth is highly advised. Using a higher fluoride-containing toothpaste and mouthwash is also advisable, although some mouthwashes do contain alcohol, and thus should be avoided since they can further dry out the mouth. Also, there are some suggestions that mouthwashes containing alcohol may be a contributing factor to mouth cancer.
  • Many alcoholics make every effort to cover up their dependence to those around them. One of the giveaway signs of drinking is the smell of alcohol on the breath so it is common practice to use strong breath mints to freshen the breath. Sucking on breath mints or chewing gum is a great way to stimulate saliva production. Saliva is nature’s way of keeping the teeth and gums clean. For people who are are going to use breath mints or chewing gum, it is a great idea to use products containing xylitol. Bacteria thrive on sugar, and it is the toxic byproduct of the metabolized sugar that causes tooth decay and infection. Xylitol is a natural sugar that disrupts bacteria’s ingestion process and effectively kills and reduces the number of harmful bacteria in the mouth. Regularly using xylitol mints, gum, sweets or toothpaste is a very easy way to improve oral health.

Of course, the most important course of action for any alcoholic is to seek help for their addiction as soon as possible, only then can the recovery and healing process really begin. Rebuilding a life after addiction can be a very long process with many fences to mend along the way. Dental health usually takes a back seat compared to other aspects of life but poor oral health can have a very real impact on many chronic and systemic diseases not to mention confidence and self-esteem.

Effects of alcohol on dental health

Dental​ ​Health​ ​Recovery

Alcohol and substance abuse can have a devastating effect on dental health but with a little time and effort, it is possible to regain a healthy smile. Achieving a good level of oral health, in theory, is relatively simple.

By following these simple steps it is possible for anybody to improve their dental health.

  • Schedule regular dentist visits to check and monitor for decay, gum disease and mouth cancer. The dental team will also scale and polish teeth if required.
  • Always brush teeth for 2 minutes twice a day.
  • Floss teeth at least once a day. Flossing can be done with string floss, interdental brushes or electric power flossers like a Waterpik.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Avoid brushing teeth immediately after eating or drinking acidic foods and drinks. This is when tooth enamel is at its softest and most vulnerable. Wait for at least half an hour to let the mouth chemistry to stabilize.Avoid brushing teeth immediately after eating or drinking acidic foods and drinks. This is when tooth enamel is at its softest and most vulnerable. Wait for at least half an hour to let the mouth chemistry to stabilize.
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste and mouthwash to protect teeth.
  • Chew or suck on Xylitol chewing gum or sweets regularly to reduce oral bacteria.Eat a healthy and balanced diet.
  • Eating natural foods that are rich in vital vitamins and minerals will help teeth and gums stay healthy.

Smile Recovery

Smile​ ​Recovery

Having a healthy smile will do wonders for a person’s confidence. For people with missing, discolored teeth or crooked teeth it is worthwhile asking your dentist for available options to improve the appearance of the teeth. Today’s advanced dentistry techniques can easily resolve dental problems and recover a person’s smile.

It is important to replace missing teeth for many health reasons and there are a number of options available:

  • Full dentures
  • Partial dentures
  • Flexible dentures
  • Fixed dentures
  • Implants
  • Mini implants

Discolored teeth can leave people embarrassed to smile, but there are many options available to remove staining and discoloration:

  • Whitening toothpastes
  • Teeth polishing
  • In office professional teeth bleaching
  • At home professional teeth bleaching
  • Veneers

Crowns Crowded or crooked teeth can also cause embarrassment but there are many procedures that can be performed to straighten any smile:

  • Cosmetic contouring
  • Bonding
  • Porcelain veneers
  • Crowns
  • Braces
  • Invisible braces

A genuine smile releases endorphins oxygenate the brain and make us feel relaxed and happy. Don’t underestimate the power of a beautiful smile.


About The Author

Dr.​ ​Mohamed​ ​Abdel​ ​Hamid​ ​BDS,​ ​MFDS​ ​RCSEd,​ ​Member​ ​of​ ​AACD


 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Giving Up Alcohol: 8 Health Changes You Can Expect

Giving up alcohol may seem like a big step, however it can herald in a raft of benefits. If you read on you will learn what these are and may be more inclined to give up.

Health Changes Giving Up Alcohol

1) A Better Night’s Sleep

 According to the latest data published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, drinking before going to sleep increases the brain’s alpha wave patterns. This sort of behaviour is usually seen during periods of conscious rest rather than full-on sleep, and it effectively translates into a disturbed sleep cycle. Data accumulated from 27 different studies confirms that although alcohol may make it easier to fall into a deep sleep, the quality of individuals’ sleep suffers greatly after the first portion of rest. In the immediate aftermath of giving up alcohol, you may find it slightly difficult to get to sleep on the first few nights. The sleep you do get is likely to feel more refreshing, leaving you feeling energised when you wake up. According to this top drug and alcohol rehab centre, getting better sleep will make it easier to concentrate and boost your mood. 

2) Better Appetite Control

Alcohol is, according to a study found in the American Journal of Nutrition, a major factor in overeating. Information from the journal Obesity suggests that this may be because alcohol serves to sharpen our senses. In that study, researchers found that women who received carefully-controlled alcohol “infusions” tended to consume 30 percent more food than control subjects who received a saline solution instead. The addition of a moderate amount of alcohol increased neural activity in the hypothalamus and made test subjects more sensitive to food aromas.

3) Sugar Cravings May Increase

Sugar is a prime culprit for boosting dopamine levels, leading to increased feelings of pleasure. Alcohol has an identical effect. It’s quite likely that cutting yourself off from one dopamine trigger will make you more tempted to reach for a different one. Indulging in something sweet may end up allowing you to recapture the same rush you used to get from taking a drink.

4) Body Weight Drops

Alcoholic beverages are packed with calories, mainly in the form of carbohydrates. As a general rule of thumb, a single serving of alcohol (a glass of wine, a beer, or a cocktail) contains roughly 150 calories. With the exception of the potential health benefits of wine (discussed below), these calories do virtually nothing for you. They provide the body with no usable nutrition, yet they’re very likely to be converted into fat.

If you drop alcohol and refrain from adding in new sources of empty calories, the odds are excellent that you’ll start to see weight loss. If your weekly average hovers around five drinks a week, cutting booze out of your life will save you over 39,000 calories a year. That, in turn, translates into 11 pounds of unwanted body fat. When New Scientist magazine tracked the experiences of 14 staffers who gave up alcohol for just 5 weeks, the participants reported an average body weight loss of two percent.

5) Clearer Skin

You’ll find that your skin gets noticeably more hydrated after just a few days of abstention. Alcohol works as a potent diuretic, leading to more frequent urination. Alcohol also interferes with the body’s ability to reabsorb water by inhibiting the production of antidiuretic hormones. Giving up alcohol can reduce redness in your cheeks and nose, and it may also help with any long-term skin conditions (dandruff, rosacea, eczema, etc) you’re having trouble with.

6) Financial Savings

Drinking can be a costly way to spend your time, especially if you cultivate a palate for fine wines or rare whiskies. Actually sitting down and calculating the amount of money you lose to alcohol can be a potent motivating experience if you need another prod to give up booze.

7) Psychological Changes

Understand that giving up alcohol can complicate your social schedule. Associating with friends who are indulging can be a source of jealousy or anger. Ranking says that alcohol is often used as a ‘social lubricant’ to make emotional exchanges easier. People who give up a drinking habit sometimes struggle with feelings of agitation and restlessness in the aftermath.

(Are you drinking too much? Run down these warning signs.)

8) Reduced Cancer Risk – But Watch The Heart

Alcohol consumption is, according to the National Cancer Institute, a risk factor for cancers occurring in the liver, mouth, breast, rectum, and colon. The more you drink, the greater the risk. Note that moderate drinking may, according to extensive research, reduce your risk of heart disease. If you are a light drinker, giving up alcohol may lead to slight increases in your risk of stroke and diabetes.

The Bottom Line

The positive results experienced in the New Scientist study mentioned above went beyond weight loss. Blood testing showed an average reduction in cholesterol levels of five percent, blood glucose of 16 percent, and liver fat of 15 percent. There’s little scientific disagreement with the contention that kicking booze out of your life will improve your health, but the five-week study show just how rapidly you can expect to see improvements after you decide to give alcohol a pass.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

10 Things to Do If your Teenager is Drinking Alcohol

Knowing that your teenage daughter or son is drinking alcohol can be quite heartbreaking for any parent. When such is the case, the first thing you need to do is allow this reality to sink in before taking any steps.

Once you have accepted this reality, the next thing to focus on is to understand your teen’s drinking problem to identify how you can help him/her out.

It is important that you do not accept a teen’s drinking behavior as normal. This is because the problem can escalate to addiction and make it hard for your teen son/daughter to quit alcohol.

Teenager Drinking Alcohol

Here are some steps to follow if you have found out your teenager is drinking alcohol:

1 Stay Calm and Assess the Situation

Although you may be absolutely livid it won’t be helpful if you come at your hormonal (and possibly hungover) teenager with guns blazing.

Yes your teenager has been drinking alcohol and it could be serious, but the facts are that teenagers are notorious for experimenting and getting into trouble. Its what they do at that age.

Stay calm and try to assess the situation objectively. What exactly happened, how severe was the incident and who was involved?

Talk to your spouse, or the other parent of your teenager if you are separated, about the incident and make sure you stand together. You don’t have to always agree with each other but you must present a united front.

2 Talk To Your Teenager About the Incident

Talking to your child is essential in this situation for a number of reasons.

The number one being that having a healthy, honest and open relationship with your child is your ultimate goal. If your child feels safe to talk to you and tell you exactly what is going on for him or her a lot of future problems can be avoided or dealt with easier.

Tell your child that you would like to know exactly what happened and you will promise not to judge or freak out.

Be prepared that your teenager may well be defensive and upset. So be prepared for it. Remember to come from a place of love, stay calm and be direct.

3 Explain the Dangers of Alcohol and Drugs to Your Teenager

Be ready to explain to your child why minors are not allowed to drink alcohol, point out things like loss of control and humiliation, getting into trouble with the law and the dangers of addiction. Discuss that dangers of peer influence and how that can lead him or her down a dangerous path.

If your family has a history of addiction chances are you child has a much higher chance of becoming addicted to alcohol or drugs than some other children. It is important that your teenager understands this.

4 Study Your Teenager and Trust Your Gut

During these discussions watch your teenagers body language and reactions to the discussion. Do you feel your teenager is being completely open and honest or is he avoiding eye contact?

Trust your gut instinct here to guide you on whether this was a one off experimental episode with alcohol or is there a deeper problem?

5 Hand Out An Appropriate Consequence

It is important to highlight to your teenager that every action has a consequence. You may want to ground your teenager for a period of time or perhaps you will have to curb your teenagers freedom in other ways such as an earlier curfew for a period of time, or even until further notice. You could also limit who your teenager is allowed to spend time with or the places he goes to.

You could also stop pocket money for a period of time. It is up to you to come up with something that you feel is appropriate.

Remember that the goal here is not to punish your teenager, it is to get your teenager to realize the seriousness of his actions so that he hopefully does not repeat them.

6 Set Boundaries for the Future

Let your teenager know that part of the consequences of his actions you need to relook at boundaries with your child and set new rules.

You may want to change the ways you manage your child’s freedom and privacy. You may feel it necessary to check your teenager’s phone, access his room and limit time online.

Let your child know what the new boundaries are and why they are being set.

Decide on what the consequences will be if there is a future incident with alcohol or drugs and let your child know what it is. Be fully prepared to carry it out.

7 Talk to Other Parents

Being friendly with the parents of your teenagers friends will mean that you can talk to them if any of those teenagers were also involved in the incident. Having all the parents on board and taking similar steps might mean all the difference.

8 Stick to the New Boundaries

It is vitally important to stick to the new boundaries that you have set for your teenager, as we all know they just love to push the boundaries. Having firm boundaries sets a safer space for your teenager.

If your teenager crosses a boundary or breaks a rule you must carry out consequences for that so your teenager knows that you mean business.

Hopefully things ends here, where you teenager pushes a bit, finds firm boundaries and decides not to test again.

9 Contact Professionals

If there are repeat episodes of your teenager drinking alcohol, taking drugs or breaking important boundaries that have been set it is a sign that there could be a much deeper problem. Or perhaps your gut instincts just tell you that something is wrong.

Contact a professional in your area (addiction counselor, therapist, family psychologist) to discuss the way forward.

10 Adolescent Treatment Program

A last and final step may be to look at sending your child to an adolescent unit or an addiction treatment facility.

 


 

This guest post is contributed by Danny from MyParentingJournal.com, a blog dedicated to parenting tips, advice, best practices, and resources.

Twitter

Facebook


 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How do I know I am an alcoholic?

This post is inspired by a discussion that I came across on Quora a few months back where someone asked how he can reduce the amount of alcohol he drinks on a night out

So that would be the first sign that you have a problem right? No normal person that does not have a problem with alcohol or drugs will ever be concerned about how they can control the amount of alcohol he or she drinks, or the amount of drugs he or she uses.

So you want to know the answer to the question: how do I know I am an alcoholic?

How do I know if I am an alcoholic questions

If you regularly drink too much, and you start obsessing about how you can control it then chances are incredibly high that you have a problem.

And it isn’t even about drinking too much really, some alcoholics actually drink very little. It is about being powerless over the alcohol and about your personality changing when you drink. It is about the way you think.

An alcoholic or addict has what is called stinking thinking.

Here’s the difference between an alcoholic and a normal person…

A normal person goes out and has too much to drink. This normal person wakes up in the morning and thinks, oh dear I had too much to drink, I won’t do that again.  Then they don’t do that again and they don’t think about it again. There is no issue.

An alcoholic will drink too much (again) come home and think about how he can control his drinking. The first thing he will do is come up with an excuse for drinking too much last night and here are some examples of things to blame:

  • His girlfriend that had a fight with him (probably because he was drinking too much)
  • His mother that nags him (probably because he drinks too much)
  • His boss that picks on him (probably because he is hung over too often)
  • The rugby game that was won, so he had to celebrate the victory
  • The rugby game that was lost, so he had to drown his sorrows
  • There was no rugby game so he was bored

Ok you get the picture anything is fair game for blame.

Next step is the alcoholic will come up with ideas to not drink so much. These ideas consist of gems like:

  • The orange juice is to blame, so I will switch from Vodka and Orange Juice to Vodka with lemonade
  • Wine goes to my head so I will drink spirits instead
  • Brandy makes me aggressive so I will stick to Vodka
  • Spirits are too strong so I will drink beer
  • I will only drink on weekends
  • I won’t drink on weekends
  • I will start drinking singles instead of doubles (but end up drinking ordering 20 drinks instead of 10)

These excuses and ideas are endless.

How do I know if I am an alcoholic?

Well I’ve covered the basics here, if you are wondering about that then chances are high you are. If you have some of those thoughts that I just mentioned then you’re getting closer to breaking through your denial.

The thing is that coming to realize you are an alcoholic is your own path, not mine. It is not a question someone else can answer for you.

This is your journey and this is your life.

Here are some more questions to ask yourself:

  • How often do you wake up not remembering what you did the night before?
  • How often do you pass out from drinking?
  • Do you ever tell yourself to control your drinking?
  • How often do you tell yourself you will just have one drink, yet drink more?
  • Do you drink first thing in the morning?
  • Have you ever stayed drunk for a few days in a row?
  • Have you ever gone into work drunk?
  • Have you switched brands or types of alcohol in the hopes that you won’t drink so much or get drunk?
  • Have you ever lost a job because of your drinking or had problems at work because of your drinking?
  • Do your loved ones complain about your drinking?
  • Are you often the last one in the bar when your friends have long since left to go home?
  • Do you sometimes become angry when you drink?
  • Do you sometimes get emotional when you drink?
  • Do you have fights with your loved ones when you have been drinking?
  • Have you ever become aggressive and abusive when you drink?
  • How often have you driven drunk?
  • Do you get the shakes when you have not had a drink? Do these shakes disappear when you have a drink?
  • Have you ever done things you are ashamed of while drunk?
  • Is your drinking causing financial problems?
  • Has anyone else in your family had a drinking problem?
  • Do you hide your drinking from the people closest to you?
  • Is your drinking causing relationship problems?
  • Have you tried to stop drinking and not been able to?
  • Have you had memory blackouts while drinking?
  • Do you eat very little or not at all when you are drinking?
  • Do you drink until you vomit? And sometimes still carry on?
  • Have you ever lost control of your bowels or bladder while drinking?

I can ask questions like these until the cows come home, but you get the picture now. My personal belief is that if you are an alcoholic you do actually know it deep down but you just don’t want to face it.

That is what happened to me anyway, there was a part of me that I buried (under loads of drugs and alcohol) that knew I was an alcoholic and a drug addict.

I recently wrote an ebook about my powerlessness over alcohol and drugs, I shared stories from when I was in active addiction. In these stories you can follow what my thought patterns where, the times I suddenly thought I might just have a problem and then how I shut those thoughts away from myself.

I believe each person has their own process to go through, their own moment of realization and I also believe that everything happens for a reason.

So if you are here reading this post there is probably a reason you are here, and I can’t answer your questions for you. Take what you need from this and I hope you find your way, whatever that path may be.

Here’s some food for thought. Until you know and acknowledge there is a problem you cannot begin to fix it. The first step to recovery begins with admitting to yourself that you have a problem.

If you are an alcoholic you can contact Alcoholics Anonymous and you will find an amazing support system and other alcoholics to help you through this.

Are you an alcoholic or an addict? How did you come to realize you had a problem?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Darkest Hour is Just Before Dawn – My real life in addiction

The last week has been quite an emotional journey for me as I have been finishing writing my eBook The Darkest Hour is Just Before Dawn which is made up of real life stories about drug addiction. My drug addiction stories from my life.

I really enjoyed writing this book in the beginning and it was an amazing process but as the time came closer and closer to publishing I got physically sick. At first I assumed it was just the flu but now I can feel very clearly that all the emotions that came up while writing this book have come out and made me physically ill.

Every day this week I have woken up with flu symptoms and every morning around 11am I have started with a headache which became a raging migraine by the time it was afternoon. Last night was the worst. By the time my husband got home from work my migraine was so bad I wanted to vomit.

It suddenly became clear to me that this is not flu, this is all due to me writing about my life in such an honest way, opening myself up to other people and sharing some of my most humiliating and painful experiences from my life – things that happened to me while I was in the throes of addiction.

Thank you to my husband that spent an hour rubbing my back, neck and shoulders last night to help me relax, completely taking away my migraine proving that this is just stress.

I am worried about what my mother will think when she reads it, when she can see how far down I had gone and the awful things I did and the awful things I experienced. I worry whether she will feel guilt or like she failed me.

So a special note to my parents – this book is dedicated to you. You never did anything wrong, this was out of your control.

Without your support and love for me I would never ever have made it out.

The title of the book is something my mother has often said to me when I am struggling with something. She tells me the darkest hour is just before dawn. So when things are at their darkest the sun is about to shine.

There is a darker side to this title too. The amount of times I have been awake all night, wired on drugs, are countless. It reminds me of all those mornings in my life when I realize I have done it again, when the light starts coming in the window and I realize I am a failure.

This eBook will share many of those moments with you.

Drug Addiction Stories Real Life

Drug Addiction Stories Real Life

I bet you are wondering why I wrote this eBook about my addiction?

The first reason is because sharing about my shame and the things I have done actually frees me from them. Shame lives in dark corners of your mind, it thrives on secrets and it grows over time. Taking that shame and bringing it into the light where everyone can see it makes it smaller and it holds less power over me.

These things that I did and that happened to me were awful, but by sharing what happened I can just maybe help others. Maybe a drug addict that is stuck in the cycle of addiction will read my book and find the strength and hope to get clean. Perhaps an addict in recovery reads my book and can relate to what happened to me and his or her shame diminishes just a little bit.

Maybe a mother will read my book and understand her addict daughter and her problem better. Perhaps this mom won’t feel so much guilt afterwards and it will ease her pain.

These are all my hopes for this eBook. I hope it takes something ugly and makes something good come of it.

Alcohol Addiction Stories

Alcohol was present at the start of my journey and at the end. Drinking was the norm in my life and something that I underestimated, something that I thought was not a problem.

Alcohol is dangerous and it is a drug. The worst part of this drug for me is that it is so socially acceptable. Even being drunk is often not looked at as the serious problem that it is.

It is very addictive and very often people think that it is not as dangerous as illegal narcotics.

I don’t think so, I look at alcohol and I see my gate way drug. Yes I also smoked Marijuana – I did smoked it first when I was drunk. Yes I snorted cocaine. I tried it first when I was drunk.

Cocaine Addiction Stories

Strangely enough cocaine only showed up in my life when I was about 24 years old but it took hold of me so fast and dragged me straight down.

In a strange way I should be grateful to cocaine.

Without it I might still be limping along with my alcohol addiction, managing to convince myself that I don’t have a problem. Perhaps it helped me sink so low that I had only a few choices left… get clean, go to jail or die.

Cocaine made me stay awake for days at a time, not eating and becoming more and more delusional as time went on.

Addiction stole 15 years of my life.

From the time I was 14 years old and I started cutting myself, drinking and getting into abusive relationships until the time I was 29 years old and hopelessly hooked on cocaine.

Real Life Drug Addiction Stories

Writing this eBook was quite tricky because everything is so fuzzy. I can’t get things from that time in my life into a chronological order.

Some of the things I remember are fuzzy because of the alcohol and drugs but some of the things I have a few realities in my mind and I can’t figure out which is which.

That must sound so strange but the thing is that as an addict I had to lie a lot to save my bacon.

I would have to tell different people different versions of events, you know one to suit each person? Over time and with retelling things in different ways there are some things that happened in my life but I just can’t figure out which is the real truth.

Another difficulty I had with writing this eBook is that this is my story, but other people were involved too.

For this reason everyone in my eBook is called Bob or Jane, faceless people all with same name. The only distinction being between male and female.

And nobody in my life was called Bob or Jane so this fits nicely. All Bob’s and Jane’s are guilt free.

The first 2 stories in my eBook are free to my subcribers, so if you have signed up for my newsletter previously you should have received your eBook already by email.

If you sign up now you will be emailed your free preview as soon as you confirm your subscription.

You can now buy my ebook from the following websites:

Fiverr

SmashWords

ListingDock

 

Make money promoting my eBook!

And of course since I am an online marketer, if you would like to promote my eBook to your friends, family or on your own website you will get 20% lifetime commission on all sales you make for my eBook from ListingDock.

The standard affiliate commission at ListingDock is 10% but I doubled that just for you!

Coming out next…

My intention for this eBook is that it is the first of three. I have now shared what my addiction was like, how bad it was. I am closing off that chapter for now.

My next next eBook will share my experience getting clean and the last will be my life in recovery, sharing how I stay clean.

Perhaps there will be more eBooks to come, who knows what my journey forward holds.

BUY The Darkest Hour is Just Before Dawn

Please give some honest feedback on my eBook if you have read it!

I would love to hear from you!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail