The Best Ways To Handle Withdrawal Symptoms From Drugs And Alcohol

When addicts get clean, it doesn’t take long for them to start noticing the benefits. Their lives, in general, are better, but they will also notice a big change in the way that they feel physically and mentally. Addiction of any kind takes a big toll on your body and when you get rid of that habit and your body starts to repair itself, you will feel so much better. But things have to get worse before they get better and so many people don’t make it far enough to see any benefits because they fall at the first hurdle. The first few days and weeks are often the hardest because you have to get through the withdrawal symptoms. If you are a heavy user, withdrawal symptoms can be horrible to deal with and a lot of people think that it’s easier to live with the addiction than it is to try to go clean. But if you can make it past the withdrawal stage and start to feel some of the physical benefits, the rest of your journey will start to feel a lot less daunting. These are some of the best ways to manage withdrawal symptoms when you are a recovering addict.

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Speak To A Counsellor

Most people experience a deep depression when they first come off drugs and alcohol. When you take away that high that you got from using drugs or alcohol, you are left with the polar opposite feeling. If you are an addict, it’s likely that drink or drugs were central to your life and so when you give them up, you are left with a void. When the depression hits hard, it’s easy to convince yourself that it’s not worth getting clean if it’s going to make you feel this bad, and you would be better off using again.

Increased anxiety is very common as well because alcohol and drugs are often used as a way to combat anxiety. When you take away that crutch, those feelings come flooding back, usually much stronger than before. But the good news is, as long as you can stay sober, this anxiety will not last that long.

The important thing here is that you don’t let these feelings overwhelm you and you don’t reach straight for the drink and drugs to combat them. Instead, you need to find healthier ways to process your feelings and put things in perspective again, which is why seeing a counsellor is a good idea if you are going through withdrawal. One of the most important things that they will do is remind you that these feelings are temporary and they are partly a result of your withdrawal. But they can also help you start to tackle the underlying problems that lead to your addiction issues in the first place.

Consider Medications

In the past, you had to go it alone with your withdrawal symptoms but that isn’t the case anymore. There are medications available that activate the pleasure receptors in your brain in the same way that drugs and alcohol do. That means that they can improve the withdrawal symptoms and make things a lot easier for you. You should seek the advice of a doctor and see if there is anything that they can offer you to help you get through the first few weeks. When you are going through withdrawal, it’s likely that you will take some time off work and things might be a little chaotic, so it’s a good idea to find an online pharmacy like Simple Online Doctor and have medication sent directly to your house. That way, you can make sure that you keep up with the medication and you cut the risk of relapsing. Taking medication can make a huge difference to your withdrawal symptoms and make it a lot more bearable, which increases your chances of getting through the difficult early stages.

Spend Time With Family

When things get really hard and you are considering using again, you need things to remind you why you are going clean in the first place. It’s easy to lose sight of that when the withdrawal symptoms make you feel so awful, which is why it’s good to be near friends and family. The people around you suffer from your addiction as well and it has a huge impact on them. When you are in the midst of your addiction, you are not thinking about them and you cause them a lot of distress. They have a lot to lose if you relapse as well, and being reminded of that can help you get through the difficult early period.

A lot of people fall at the first hurdle because withdrawal can be horrible to deal with, but if you can make it through that, you stand a much better chance of staying sober for good.

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Understanding How Medication Assisted Treatment Can Help Opioid Addiction

Opioid Use Disorder and Medication-Assisted Treatment

Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) is a chronic, lifelong condition that affects quality of life, familiar relationships, and daily functioning. Unfortunately, much of the American public sees OUD as a moral failing, not a treatable medical condition. The reality is that OUD is a physiological response that develops after consistent use of opioids. Many opioid use disorders begin with a valid prescription to treat pain.

There are many reasons that a person experiencing OUD may find it difficult to stop, chief among them are the physiological and psychological pain of withdrawal. Medication-Assisted Treatment is a viable, evidence-based method of treating OUD that supports a long-term recovery.

What Is Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)?

Medication-Assisted Treatment, or MAT, combines psychosocial, behavioral interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat Opioid Use Disorder. Medications used in MAT help address the physiological aspects of opioid addiction, while behavioral interventions address the other complex factors that contribute to the substance use disorder, such as trauma, family dynamics, or co-occurring mental health disorders. By addressing all factors simultaneously, providers can identify triggers, control cravings, and reduce the likelihood of relapse.

Understanding How Medically Assisted Treatment Can Help Opioid Addiction

Medication-Assisted Treatment and Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS)

Understanding the benefits of MAT first requires knowledge of how opioids affect the body and brain. An Opioid Use Disorder most often occurs when a person receives a prescription for a pain-relieving opioid following surgery or for a legitimate medical condition. When the affected individual takes the medication, it effectively controls pain because it works by blocking pain receptors. A side effect is a triggered sense of euphoria. Reliving this sense of euphoria is what may cause a person to misuse opioids for the first time. Over time, as the disorder progresses, the affected individual’s brain chemistry changes, such that it relies on the opioids to trigger the production of dopamine (the neurotransmitter responsible for the euphoria, but also in charge of several other important functions). This forms the basis for opioid dependence.

When the affected individual tries to abstain for opioids, withdrawal is the result, since the body no longer produces dopamine effectively on its own. Opioid withdrawal is notoriously painful and produces several troubling symptoms, such as:

  • Diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting
  • Chills
  • Muscle aches
  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Irritability
  • Headache
  • Heart palpitations
  • Arrhythmias
  • Heart palpitations
  • Headache

These symptoms are often very intense, so much so that a person with OUD will use again simply to make them stop. Even once a person physiologically detoxifies from an opioid – a process that can take around three days but typically lasts up to a week – the psychological effects persist for weeks or months. Medication Assisted Treatment works by managing the symptoms of withdrawal by reducing cravings and minimizing discomfort.

What Is Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS)?

The process of initial detoxification varies, but the most intense feelings of discomfort occur within the first 72 hours. Within 7-10 days, a person may be physiologically detoxified from the opioids. After this period ends, a person with OUD is vulnerable to a condition called post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS).

PAWS refers to the psychological and emotional effects of an addiction. The symptoms may persist for weeks and months, even up to two years after initial detox. Symptoms tend to occur in waves and may include:

  • Insomnia
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Intense cravings for the drugs
  • Emotional instability and irritability, quick to anger

One of the ways that Medication-Assisted Treatment can be beneficial is in the treatment of PAWS. People who utilize MAT report fewer cravings and reduced symptoms of PAWS, which can help support a long-term recovery by significantly reducing the risk of relapse.

Effective MAT Treatments for Opioid Use Disorder

Currently, only three FDA-approved medications exist for the treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: methadone, suboxone, and naltrexone. Here’s some information about each.

Methadone

Methadone produces a similar effect to opioids, but to a lesser extent and with milder effects. It is longer lasting and does not have the same increased potential for misuse; it does not tend to affect a person’s ability to function normally. As an opioid agonist, it works to provide relief of some of the most painful symptoms of withdrawal and PAWS. A single dose of methadone lasts about a day and a half. Some potential for misuse exists; as such, it may only be dispensed by a licensed provider in a clinical setting. A person on methadone treatment must visit the clinic for a new dose every couple of days, so they must be willing to remain compliant to the protocol.

Buprenorphine (Suboxone)

Buprenorphine is becoming a more popular choice amongst healthcare providers, as it is a partial opioid agonist and does not have a high potential for misuse. Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone (Narcan), a medication used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. While it is difficult to misuse, it still requires regular visits to a medical provider to receive. Providers who wish to prescribe suboxone must attend an eight hour training course to obtain a MAT waiver, so not all providers can prescribe it.

Naltrexone

Naltrexone is available in two forms: a pill or an intramuscular injection lasting up to 30 days. When taken as an intramuscular injection (Vivitrol), it provides a convenient option, particularly for those looking for an intensive outpatient treatment option. The once-daily pill can be taken in the comfort of a person’s own home. It has little potential for misuse or diversion; as such, any provider who is licensed to dispense medication may prescribe it.

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist, which means it works by blocking opioid receptors. It effectively reduces cravings in the person taking it because it no longer produces a feeling or euphoria or “high.” However, Naltrexone is only a suitable option after a person initially detoxifies from the physiological effects of opioids; starting it too early can make withdrawal symptoms worse.

MAT as an Effective Treatment Option

Numerous studies show that Medication-Assisted Treatment is more effective in preventing relapse and supporting long-term recovery compared to behavioral interventions alone. The National Institute on Drug Abuse supports the use of MAT as an integral part of an addiction treatment plan. According to their research:

  • MAT is effective in decreasing overall opioid use and its associated harms, including overdose death, transmission of infectious diseases such as Hepatitis C, and illegal drug-related activity. When the city of Baltimore introduced an initiative to increase access to buprenorphine, overdose deaths in the city decreased by 37%.
  • The use of MAT in pregnant women reduces the symptoms of neonatal abstinence syndrome, which occurs when a baby is born with a dependence on opioids.
  • The use of MAT in treatment programs improves compliance to other protocol and follow-up. Patients who receive medications for their OUD are more likely to remain in treatment and receive holistic interventions that support a long term recovery. With increased comfort comes increased ability to develop compensatory mechanisms to manage their disorder and its possible triggers.

Facts and Myths About Medication Assisted Treatment

MAT has a large body of evidence supporting its use as a viable treatment option. Unfortunately, the public and even some clinicians continue to have misconceptions about the uses of MAT in the treatment of Opioid Use Disorder. These myths can work to keep people from utilizing MAT, when it could prove vital to their recovery process. For example:

  • Some people and providers believe MAT is simply the act of substituting one addiction for another. In reality, MAT is only one aspect of a holistic treatment plan. Medications help manage the discomfort of withdrawal and PAWS, which allows the patient to focus on other aspects of recovery. Since some medications for OUD have potential for misuse, they must be administered in a supervised clinical setting (i.e., methadone).
  • MAT is not, and never will be, popping a pill to cure an addiction. One essential aspect of MAT is the behavioral intervention, which allows people to explore and recognize the triggers for their addiction. Anyone in long-term recovery knows that a substance use disorder is not something that can be “cured;” rather, it is something that they work consciously on the rest of their lives.
  • Despite popular opinion, medications for MAT do not pose much risk for diversion. They are heavily regulated and require extensive training to prescribe. The only formulation that does not require waiver training, Naltrexone, has very little potential for abuse, since using it in conjunction with opioids will send the person taking it into withdrawal.

The Use of MAT for Opioid Use Disorder

MAT can play a vital role in the treatment of OUD by reducing cravings and controlling long-term symptoms of withdrawal, including those for post acute withdrawal syndrome. When combined with other behavioral interventions, it can help a person with OUD sustain a long-term recovery.

Continuum Recovery Center provides intensive outpatient services, including MAT, for the treatment of opioid use disorder. Our protocols, which include psychosocial, evidence based mental health therapies, help individuals identify the many facets of their opioid use disorder to maintain sobriety.


About The Author

Geffen Liberman, staff therapist at Continuum Recovery Center, has been in the field for over 20 years, and has worked in every facet of substance abuse treatment. Using his own personal experience in recovery and the education he has learned while in the field, Geffen can relate and connect with clients in a way that promotes recovery, self-love and the desire for clients to achieve the best for themselves. Geffen is licensed in Arizona as a substance abuse counselor and has an IC&RC certification, as well as a life coaching certification.


 

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Why Addicts Should Choose Singapore as a Place to Go to Rehab

A good rehabilitation center should have the necessary facilities to assist drug addicted patients on their recovery journey. If you have a victim in your family, you will agree that this is a serious situation that requires the best solution. That is why people are ready to use any family resources possible to get the best rehab in the world.

For those who did not know, Singapore has some of the best rehab facilities in the world. This is one of the primary reasons why drugs addicts come from various parts of the world. However, there is more that they offer. If you read the highlights below, you will learn more reasons why you should choose Singapore as a place to go to rehab.

Why Addicts Should Choose Singapore As A Place To Go To Rehab

Draconian Drug Laws

The country is a leader in practicing stringent drug laws. Narcotics that are listed as illegal are rarely found in the country. The law is clear about what will happen if one is found manufacturing, distributing, or in possession of such drugs. The imprisonment terms range from punishment to life imprisonment, which is not something that any person would like to get involved in.

But how do these laws assist the country in having rehab centers worth considering? According to reports, people who are recovering from drugs are likely to have a better environment when they are in Singapore. This is because they will not get access to drugs even if they are using outpatient programs. Thus, the recovery process will not only be clear of drugs, but will also be quick as one interacts with people who are already drug-free.

Well-Equipped Rehab Centers

Being a developed country, Singapore does not strain for resources. Although most of them are imported, it is notable that all of the rehab facilities in Singapore follow world standards. The country values high-quality services, especially in medical care, which rehab facilities fall into. With the government in support of operations of these facilities, they are well-funded and equipped.

Thus, people from different parts of the world, especially developing countries, want to bring their addicted family members to enjoy these facilities. Some of the best amenities you will enjoy in Singapore rehab centers include but are not limited to the following:

  • Maintained sports facilities – Rehab centers in Singapore have generous sports grounds for patients to use. One has the option to choose a sport like beach soccer, cricket, tennis, and many others. Indoor games like table tennis, pool tables, and many others are also available. Thus, the patients have a variety of options to choose from depending on their interests and talents.
  • Talent promotion facilities – Drugs addict may have talents that need to be nurtured. Singapore is one of the countries that promote talents in rehab centers through the provision of musical equipment, art facilities, and many others. This means that your patient has a high opportunity of learning new skills and advancing their talents to new levels by the time they leave.
  • Disability facilities – Some drugs lead to disabilities which affect peoples’ mobility. If your victim is like this, there is no reason to get worried. Singapore’s rehab centers usually make this consideration by providing wheelchairs, support racks, and all other equipment that supports disabilities of any kind.

Singapore scene

Qualified Rehab Workers

The state has a high literacy level. They also get qualified professionals from other countries by giving work permits. As a matter of fact, you can easily get a work visa through the Visa Express Singapore agency. As a result of this, all rehab centers are well-equipped with qualified workers. An addiction patient will get enough one-on-one time with a psychologist to get the best assistance possible. Nurses and other workers are also trained to cater to all the needs of an addiction patient.

Reports from the health ministry indicate that all rehab centers in Singapore have enough workers to serve sufficiently when they are at full capacity. They also assure the entire world that the staff has the relevant qualifications. So if you are looking for the best facility to use, Singapore should be your preferred destination.

Services at a Low Cost

We have already mentioned that the Singaporean government supports the health sector very well. Rehab facilities are one of the beneficiaries whether they are government-owned or private. The result of such support is the provision of low-cost services to the patients. Both the medication and boarding services are affordable to both citizens and foreigners.

Another thing that makes it affordable is the use of insurance. You are likely to use health insurance to get some medications and services in Singapore. The good news is that they also accept international medical coverage policies. However, it is important to understand what your health insurance policy will cover before booking your patient.

Group therapy addiction

Serene Environment

Singapore is known to be a city-state. However, it has a vast serene region outside of the city where most of the rehab centers are located. If you do some research about these facilities, you will realize that most of them are surrounded by beautiful trees, flowers, and stunning natural habitats. This allows addicts to reflect on their life and focus more on what they want in the future.

According to psychologists, the serenity is therapy in itself. That is why addicts are in a better position to recover when they are in Singapore. Do not hesitate to bring your patient here to enjoy this rare tranquility and serenity.

Excellent Networking Opportunities

Drug addicts need a network of people who can help them in life. Most rehab centers in Singapore have various programs that bring recovering patients together to share their experiences. Since people come from different countries and careers, it is easy to make good friends. Some people partner in business from such meetings and prosper in life together.

Conclusion

If you are wondering why rehab in Singapore is the best, now you have the main reasons. Traveling to Singapore from another country is also an opportunity to enjoy excellent scenery and have many other experiences.


About The Author

Emily Simpson is a qualified Psychologist in Singapore. She has a Master’s Degree in Psychology and has helped tens of drugs addicts to get back into their feet. She has sat in various forums that enlighten people on the effects of drug abuse and how they can stop the menace. For the love of a drug-free nation, she has also written numerous publications on the negative effects of drug abuse on society. Her dream is to see fewer patients in rehab centers as a result of a responsible world that does not abuse narcotics.


 

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5 Tips For Staying Sober Over The Festive Season

Whether this is going to be your first sober Christmas or your 10th you need to put a little bit of thought and effort into how you are going to manage the upcoming festive season.

Over the Christmas period and New Years Eve the alcohol flows, the parties are pumping and drugs are encountered more often at social gatherings. Even addicts and alcoholics with long time recovery will be facing these challenges.

***Disclosure -The links in this post may contain affiliate links and I may receive a small commission if you make a purchase after clicking on a link.***

5 Tis For Staying Sober Over The Festive Season

Have A Plan

Make sure to plan your Christmas and News Years Eve festivities long in advance. If you are new to recovery and facing your first sober festive season you may feel at a bit of a loss. Very likely previous festive seasons were rather drunk and debortuous.

The best way to spend your first Christmas and New Years Eve is with other recovering alcoholics and addicts that understand exactly what you are going through. You need to be around people that are sober and that can show you how to have fun without alcohol and drugs. You need to create new memories and experiences to look back on.

Chances are high that you are not in contact with all the people that you were using with and drinking with. Being in recovery is about doing things differently and surrounding yourself with the winners.

Many groups in recovery hold sober parties over the festive season – make sure you know where and when they are and make a commitment to join.

If you are going to spend Christmas with family make sure that you plan ahead, that you are aware of your triggers and how you are going to cope. Talk to your family, recovery sponsor and counselor about your relapse prevention plan. The more support you have the better.

Be prepared for the conflicting feelings you will have. Chances are high that you are going to be feeling a lot of uncomfortable and often conflicting feelings. You may feel sad, lonely, angry, anxious and even excited. All of these feelings can be triggers. Have a plan in place for dealing with these feelings.

Christmas Tree decoration

Stay Active & Busy

Stay active during the holidays both with activities to do, but also with physical activity that will be good for you health. Find things to do that will give you a full body exercise as well as provide fun and entertainment.

Go hiking, mountain biking or any other outdoor activities – get yourself out there into nature. It will do you the world of good.

Another great way to stay clean is to read recovery literature – you can read the Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book which gives a lot of recovery information, along with personal stories from alcoholics. There are also lots of books written by alcoholics and addicts that will give you strength, inspiration and understanding of addiction.


You need to keep yourself busy and, just as important, you need to create new memories to look back on. It is so common for addicts and alcoholics to think back to their drinking and using days, remembering only the fun parts and leaving out all the damages and chaos that came with it. Building new and happy memories of sober festive seasons will make it easier to face each time.

Stay Connected With Your Support System

If you are a member of Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, SMART recovery group or any other recovery group such as through your church make sure to stay connected and attend meetings throughout the holidays.

If you went to a drug rehab center contact them and find out if they have anything planned for the festive season that you can attend.

If you are going away on holiday find out if that area has any recovery groups, chances are very high that they do. Just because you are on holiday does not mean you can forget about your recovery program – you will need it more than ever.

Make sure you have a sober buddy on call that you can phone at any time if you feel like having a drug or taking drugs. You may even want to have a sober buddy for the holidays – you can help each other stay sober and attend events together. It is so much easier to stay sober when you are not alone.

Woman wrapping Christmas gift

People, Places & Things

I’m sure you’ve heard this before over and over again – but it must be said again. You need to avoid the people, places and things associated with your using. Be very careful about the events that you attend, pay careful attention to who may be going to events that you would like to go to and make sure that you stay away from any places that may trigger you.

How To Cope Being Offered Alcohol/ Drugs

Chances are high that no matter what you do or where you go, at some stage during the festive season, someone may offer you a drink or a drug.

Make sure that you have a response prepared rather than being caught by surprise not knowing what to say. You may be comfortable with saying you can’t drink, but you may not want to tell people yet why you are not drinking. That is fine if you don’t want to give the real reason, but a response lined up and ready.

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10 Things I Have Learned In 10 Years Of Sobriety

On Thursday 02 August 2018 it was my 10 years sobriety birthday and I honestly can’t believe I have made it so far. Here’s the truth – the thought of living without drugs or alcohol has always been too scary for me. The thought that I am “not allowed” to do something is not good for me. I have a defiant personality – nobody must tell me I can’t because I will go and do it.

Yes I know not exactly mature, but its the truth and I can say it. Instead I have always told myself if I want to use drugs or drink I am allowed to. Instead right now I choose not to. You see if its my choice its ok.

When I’ve had hard days and was tempted I told myself yes I can use and if I still feel this bad tomorrow I can do it, but for this moment I choose sobriety.

I have now chosen sobriety every single day for 10 days and it is incredible. On my 10th sober birthday I was overcome with emotion, I was teary all day. I didn’t expect that.

Hello, I’ve had 9 other big milestones, so what is so special about my first double digit birthday? Honestly I don’t know, but for some reason this one really got the tears going in a big way.

So I guess that this is a big recovery milestone, and in celebration I will share some of the things I have learned in last 10 years.

10 Things I've Learned In 10 Years Of Sobriety

Addiction Has Very Little To Do With Drugs or Alcohol

Yes I know, it sounds crazy right. We all picture addicts as lying in the gutter and not being able to say no to drugs. It’s the alcoholic that cannot stay away from the drink and he drinks until he pukes and passes out.

No, not really this is not true at all. There are so many things that people believe to be true when it comes to addiction.

Addiction is something else entirely, it is actually not centered whatever it is that you are addicted to whether it be street drugs, prescription medication, alcohol, sex, gambling, eating, not eating, exercise, work, internet…

It is about the person.

It is about why I used, what I was trying to escape from. It was about who became when I used drugs and drank. It was not about how much I used, when or how. It wasn’t about drugs, it was about me and the black hole I was trying to fill.

When the drugs and alcohol were gone I had to face myself and I was one messed up person.

Many people assume that the most part of addiction therapy is focused on keeping the addict away from their drug of choice, when in fact it is focused around working through past trauma, changing negative behavioral patterns and providing the addict with tools to cope with their emotions and with every day life.

Recovery Takes Time and Work

There is no such thing as recovered, I have said it over and I over. I am an addict. I am in recovery. I am not recovered. That would imply that I am cured and I am fixed. That will mean I can use again.

I know I can’t use.

It is so interesting to look back on how I have changed and matured over the years. When I was one year clean in my mind I was really working recovery and I was as close to “fixed” as an addict can get. Oh my word no, I was still so messed up then.

I look at even the first 2, 3 or even 4 years of recovery and I was like an emotionally immature child.

Recovery is not going to rehab, it is not going to meetings or doing step work. It is about living recovery, working recovery every day. Being a recovering addict is part of me and something that is part of everything I do. I am always conscious of it and know that I must evaluate every decision I make to see if I am slipping into old behavior. Yes even now 10 years down the line, in fact especially now, so I don’t slip into complacency.

Water lotus flower

Labels Suck

Addict, alcoholic, sex and love addict, codependent, bipolar disorder, nicotine addict, compulsive spender…. oh my word so many labels and so little time. I used to get so stuck on all the labels.

I am who I am and yes maybe those things are part of me, but they do not define me. I am also a daughter, a sister, a wife, a mother and many more things.

When I was first diagnosed as bipolar it felt like my world was crashing and I had this huge label on my forehead telling everyone how damaged I was.

If you are in early recovery, let them slap labels on you and just relax. You are still the same person you were yesterday before you got the label. Learn about it, figure out how to manage it and find some coping skills, but don’t get too stuck on it.

There’s More Than One Way

Yes I got clean in rehab and I am part of the 12 step program but that is not the only way. There are people that get clean through their church, youth programs, SMART recovery and cognitive behavioral therapy and they are just fine.

When I got clean it was hammered into me that the 12 steps is THE way. It is a way and it is the way I did it but I now have a much more open mind and yes I attend meetings every now and then but I have a wide circle of recovery friends and lots of them do things differently. That’s ok.

I still do some 12 step meetings, but I mostly have formed my own support network of recovering addicts, other mothers and people with mental health issues. I’ve joined online support groups and I take part in online coaching which I find very beneficial.

Peace and harmony

An Addict Will Do It When Ready

When I sponsored addicts I would get so hung up on them staying clean – if an addict is ready he will find the way. He will find recovery and he will get clean. If he is not ready it will not happen. Yes things that I say or do can perhaps make a difference but it is out of my hands.

Now I don’t get too involved, I take a step back and I guide where needed. I am happier for it.

Happiness Is A Choice

Yes I know there are people with clinical depression that need counseling and possibly medication but I am no talking about those people. I am talking about me.

When I decided to be happy I became happy. When I decided to love myself I started to love myself. When I decided to love my life I started to love my life.

A lot of our mindset is a choice. Often we choose to be stuck. I unstuck myself and I am so grateful I did. I was stuck long into my recovery journey and it is only quite recently that I feel well and truly unstuck.

Finally I feel at one with myself and with my life. Everything feels right and I feel a peace. This is for the first time in my life.

Love Is Not A Feeling

Being a sex and love addict I was always searching for this feeling of love, for this high that comes with it. It does not exist, ok maybe he first time you fall in love with someone you get that giddy feeling but that fades away and reality sets in. After that love is a choice and it is work.

Love is a doing thing, it is not a feeling. Except when it comes to my kids… then it is an overwhelming feeling of love and loads of doing… doing washing, doing dishes, doing homework, wiping little noses…

But when it comes to my marriage there has been a lot of learning. I’ve had to grow up and learn how to truly love someone and be committed.

And love is not only about other people, it is also for myself. I need to look after myself and love myself, this too takes work.

Ashtray cigarattes

Nicotine Addiction Is HECTIC

I started smoking when I was 14 years old and I smoked for 22 years – for more than half my life. Two years ago I quit smoking and it was harder than quitting drugs and alcohol. It knocked me for a sixer, but I did it and I am proud.

I’ve started to wonder what the gateway drug really is. Some people call it marijuana but I wonder if it isn’t actually cigarettes and then alcohol? Both are more “socially acceptable” than street drugs and they are a huge problem.

I bet most people that try marijuana for the first time have smoked a cigarette first.

Active Addiction Is Harder Than Recovery

Everyone tells me “Oh it must have been so hard to get clean!” and yes it was hard. However when I really started to work on my recovery I quickly realized that is was much easier than using. I only put a fraction of the effort into my recovery that I put into using and I flew.

Being in active addiction is so much work! It is hard and it is draining. All that scheming to get money to get drugs, all that scheming to get hold of the drugs, then covering up doing the drugs and lying to people. Then lying to people to cover up the lies that you told other people. Then not remembering what lies you told to each person. All the ducking and diving and worrying.

It was awful. Being in recovery is easier, it is lighter on the soul. Yes you have to start cleaning up the messes you made but you are not living in the mess and drama anymore.

I Detest Drama

Early recovery felt strange, it always felt like something was about to happen, like something should happen. Things were so calm and smooth. It felt uncomfortable and I was always on edge.

Over time this feeling became normal. It is the absence of drama.

My life used to be constant drama and now I detest drama. When things go pear shaped now I get this awful feeling of dread in the pit of my stomach.

I like the quiet and the calm of being at home. I like routine and family life. This is what life is about.

Check out the Abbeycare Foundation for information about recovery,

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8 Tips For Staying Clean In Early Recovery

Many people think that getting clean is the hardest part and while that may be true in certain cases, especially when it comes to drugs such as heroin which can have an intensely hard detox process, however very often the hard part is in early recovery. The drugs have completely left your system and you are no longer physically craving the drug but facing life on life’s terms and learning how to cope with every day situations is tough. In addition to facing every day situations you will also need to face the music when it comes to all the consequences of your addiction. This is the reason why many addicts get clean and then relapse again after just a few short months.

Once you have come off your drug of choice the hard work really begins. Here are some tips for staying clean in early recovery:

8 Tips For Staying Clean In Early Recovery

Go To Meetings

If you got clean through a 12 Step program make sure to go to meetings regularly – as often as you possibly can. In the 12 Step Program they talk about attending 90 meetings in 90 days and this is a great idea. It may seem like a lot of work and it may be a strain but it will really help you to stay clean.

There are also SMART recovery meetings that you can attend. You may have gotten clean through a church program – speak to someone there are find out if there are regular support meetings you can attend.

It doesn’t matter how you got clean – what matters now is that you stay clean and doing it alone is hard and chances of relapse are high. Find some sort of support group or meeting and make sure to go regularly.

Being in a group and healing mind, body and spirit together is important for your recovery according to Sunspire Health Texas that offers addiction treatment in Texas.

Get A Sponsor

Find someone in recovery that has good clean time that can help you and support you in your recovery journey. Being able to talk to someone that has a strong recovery and understands where you are at in your recovery will be a lifesaver.

Talking regularly to your sponsor will help to keep you on the right path. Your sponsor will be able to give you some excellent insight into your process and will also be able to give you some great advice on how to cope with the various situations you will find yourself in when you are clean.

Things which non-addicts take in their stride every day without a second thought may seem like a mountain to climb for you. A good example of this is getting a job – how to cope with job interviews, how to explain the long periods of employment and how to explain the many jobs you may have been fired from. You may even have a criminal record and many companies ask you whether you have a criminal record.

These things can be incredibly tricky to navigate through.

Support group

Go For Counseling

Yes it may seem like an overkill but a counselor and a sponsor are not the same thing. For starters a counselor is a trained professional that has helped many other people overcome obstacles in life.

Chances are high that you have some underlying issues that you need to work through, especially if you have not gone for addiction treatment. If you want the best possible chances of staying clean and rocking your recovery then having regular counseling sessions is highly recommended.

As per Desert Palms that offers addiction treatment in California – addiction is treatment is tough but you will learn about the process of addiction and the reasons why you keep using. You will learn healthy coping techniques and stand a much better chance of long term recovery.

Stay Out Of Romantic Relationships

One of the fastest ways to relapse is to get into a romantic relationship too soon. In early recovery addicts are not able to cope with emotional highs and lows very well at all.

In addition to that addicts are often looking for something outside themselves to make themselves feel better. Take away the drugs, alcohol and other crutches an addict usually makes use of and a relationship may be one of the first things an addict tries to make themselves feel better.

It is important to learn healthy coping mechanisms and to keep things as stable as possible for at least the first year of recovery.

There are often jokes in movies about first getting a plant and if after 6 months that survives get a pet. After a year if our plant and pet are still alive and if you are still clean then you are ready for a relationship. It may be done in a joking way but stick to this.

Recognize Your Triggers

Through meetings, chatting to your sponsor and sessions with your counselor you will start to recognize your triggers. When you can recognize your triggers you can start to deal with them in a different way and not revert to your usual and destructive ways of coping.

Being in recovery is about learning healthy coping mechanisms and then implementing those instead of using.

Plan For Festivities

Your first birthday, Christmas, Valentines, New Years Eve, Easter and many other special occasions will be times that will most likely be uncomfortable and trying for you. Make sure to have a plan in place for each of these occasions.

This is also where being part of a recovery community such as the 12 step program really comes in handy. There will be sober events and meetings held at these times to support you and help you get through them sober.

If it is your own birthday make sure to chat to your sponsor and counselor to ensure that this is a safe time.

People, Places and Things

Hanging out in your local pub to get a lemonade is not the best idea – trust me on this I tried it and it always ended up badly for me. Likewise hanging out with your using friends will always lead to trouble.

Being in recovery means a new way of life and letting go of the people, places and things associated with your using and your old way of life. Yes this is tough to do but it is essential if you want to make it with your recovery.

Reading and Drinking Coffee

Take Up New Hobbies

Your life up until you got clean was filled with destructive habits and things that did not benefit you. Chances are that you did not participate much in any healthy hobbies. Now is the time to take up something new. It is all very well cutting out the bad things in your life but you need to fill those gaps with something new.

Taking up hiking, reading or crafting will give you a healthy way to spend your time.

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Addiction and Treating The Underlying Causes Of Destructive Behaviour

It is a misconception that addiction is all about the drug. Many people believe that once an addict is clean from a drug the hard part is done and dusted and the process of staying off the drugs is easy. This could not be further from the truth. In most cases for an addict the easiest part is getting clean from his drug of choice and the hard part is staying clean and learning how to live without his drug of choice.

Yes it is true that some addicts struggle with getting physically clean from their drug of choice and depending on the drug the addict may need a medically assisted detox. This can make the process of getting clean tough, however the real hard work begins when the addict is considered sober and then has to face life and reality without drugs.

Addiction and Treating The Underlying Cause Of Destructive Behaviour

Trauma and Addiction

According to studies two thirds of drug addicts that seek treatment report being sexually, physically and/ or emotionally abused during childhood.

When a child is growing up his circumstances and experiences will certainly impact his physical and psychological development. Very often these issues are not resolved during childhood and unless dealt with as part of the addiction recovery process these issues will continue to add to the addict’s self destructive behavior.

There is also a link between PTSD and addiction. About 50 – 60% of people that suffer from PTSD have addiction problems, the reverse is true too where. Anyone that has gone through a very traumatic event, like rape, often suffers from PTSD and/ or other psychological problems.

This much is clear – the relationship between substance abuse and trauma is closely intertwined. Click here to find out more about trauma and addiction treatment.

Childhood abuse alcoholism

Trauma During Addiction

Now while it is clear that trauma and addiction are closely linked showing that trauma may contributing to addictive behaviors there is another side to it. While an addict is in active addiction there are countless more traumatic moments. Some severe and some not so severe but still traumatic.

Addicts are well known for wrecking their own lives and the lives of those that they love. Someone that is normally a calm and loving person yet addicted to drugs, may become aggressive and abusive towards his family.

It is simply not possible for an addictive to have a healthy relationship with anyone. Love relationships will be destructive and toxic and most likely with a partner that is also an addict.

Losing a job, losing a home, getting a divorce and being arrested are all terribly traumatic things to happen to anyone and chances are that if you are an addict you have done every single one of these, often more than once.

Very often an addict has a dual diagnosis which means that he suffers from a mental disorder as well as the addiction. This is hardly surprising since going through so much trauma will inevitably lead to things like anxiety, depression, PTSD and more. Drugs and alcohol can also change the chemistry of the brain to even further complicate matters.

Individual Counselling session

 The Importance Of Dealing With Underlying Issues

Focusing on the causes of destructive behaviors is essential during the process of recovery from addiction. Treating the cause of the destructive behaviors and not just the symptoms will help addicts to achieve and maintain long term recovery.

In order to prevent relapse it is essential for addicts to receive trauma counselling to deal with unresolved issues.

Family therapy is also vitally important to recovery from addiction. Family relations will no doubt have suffered damage during the course of addiction. Very often the addict is not the only person in the family that has suffered from trauma and these family patterns will have destructive effects if they are not addressed during therapy.

Very often family members of the addict are addicts themselves, or codependents that are enabling the addicts behaviour.

The addict needs to not only deal with the underlying issues surrounding his addiction, but also be taught new ways of coping with emotional pain, stress and anxiety that has resulted from trauma but also from every day events, so that he can cope with life in a healthy way when leaving treatment for addiction.

When the addict recognizes and understand the triggers and reasons behind them that drive him to use he can start applying the healthy coping skills learned in treatment to help prevent relapsing. Click here to read more about relapse prevention.

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Getting Through My Miscarriage (Mostly) Sober

This year started off so well for me. I even wrote a blog on Wealthy Affiliate titled 2018 Is Going To Be Amazing because business was coming in and I was feeling so positive. 2018 was going to be the year it all came together for me. I could feel it!

Just two weeks later I found myself in hospital finding out that I was pregnant (huge shock here since I was sterilized), I was losing my baby and my life was in danger. I had an ectopic pregnancy, which is where the fetus embeds outside the womb. There is no chance the baby will be able to make it because it was in my tube and my tube had ruptured. I had internal bleeding and if they didn’t operate I would die.

Honestly I drove to hospital convinced that my appendix had burst and praying for anything else. Funny how you pray for something and then realize that the first option would have been so much easier.

Getting Through My Miscarriage (Mostly) Sober

If you have been following my blog or read my ebook then you will know that my addiction has taken me to some dark and ugly places. The thing is that this experience I went through less than 2 months ago was so intensely painful, it beats anything that I have ever been through hands down. I’ve been beaten, I’ve been abused and I’ve been raped. And I’m still standing… but this miscarriage brought me to my knees.

I didn’t want another baby, that is why I had my tubes cut when my son was born in 2013. But that doesn’t change how I felt when I found out I was pregnant. It was a shock, but it was my baby. Then I was losing it. Having that come at me out of the blue knocked me so flat I can’t even describe the feeling.

One of the big things for me being an addict is that I struggle to cope with intense feelings. My coping mechanism for so many years was drugs and alcohol that it can be very hard for me to sit with uncomfortable feelings and just feel them.

After my opI remember clearly lying on the operating table feeling the anesthetics stinging in my arm, about to knock me out. Tears rolling out of my eyes, wondering how on earth I got to this place. I was just feeling the shock and it felt like seconds later when I woke up vomiting and crying. It was done, my baby was gone.

A few hours after the operation a doctor came in to see me and he said he sees on my chart I am an addict and that I have been prescribed an anti-inflammatory and paracetamol, but he just wants me to know that if I do need it he has prescribed morphine. I was nauseas, emotional and in pain. I told him thank you, I will let him know.

I closed my eyes and I thought about the absolutely divine oblivion that morphine would bring me. All this pain would magically go away, I could block the events of the last few hours out.

It dawned on me suddenly that not once did I think about the physical pain while considering taking morphine, I didn’t care about the physical pain. I wanted my mind to be blotto. I wanted respite from the emotional and spiritual pain I was in.


When the doctor came back to check on me I asked him to please scratch out the morphine on my chart. I must not have it. It hurt just saying that to him. I was going to do this the hard way, the recovery way. Have I said yet how much I resent paracetamol? I’m not sure but really I do. When everyone else is getting all the good stuff I get paracetamol after an operation. That stuff doesn’t even work for a headache… but I will take them anyway and just hope that they do something.

A week after my operation I went to my GP for a checkup and he said I had a slight infection so I was put on antibiotics. He asked me how the pain was and I told him awful so he gave me some more meds. I barely looked at the meds, I was struggling to cope and I have had the same GP for nearly 7 years.

That was on a Monday afternoon. On the Wednesday afternoon at about 4pm I started feeling edgy, anxious and short tempered. I checked my watch to see if it was time for my meds… still a few hours till meds time. Then I started grinding my teeth…. and connected the dots. My husband was home early and I asked him to please check the medication. He came back to me and said it doesn’t look like there is anything addictive. But I knew. I could feel it. The hunger. I asked him to check everything in it online for me please.

I was too jittery and uncomfortable to do it myself. I was in the bedroom and I kept the door closed.

He came back and told me it has Tramadol in it. Geez I even published a blog post on my website about Tramadol. Forehead slap.

I couldn’t believe it had taken me 3 days to realize I was high. I felt so darn stupid. Then again I had been feeling dissociated a lot since the operation, so maybe I shouldn’t be so hard on myself.

I phoned my mother to let her know, just to be on the safe side. Who knows what might happen even though I have  years clean time behind me. It was a little scary. I looked up the withdrawal symptoms of Tramadol and it looked quite rotten but I had not been taking more than was prescribed and it was only 3 days of use.

I take Seroquel in small doses to help me with my insomnia and when I am struggling with my bipolar disorder or under a lot of stress I chat to my doctor and increase my Seroquel dosage for a while.

I got hold of my GP on whatsapp and let him know he gave me addictive medication and asked if I could double up my Seroquel for the night to get myself to sleep and he said that is fine, along with an apology.

Fortunately I fell asleep quite quickly and aside from feeling a little but ditsy for a couple of days I coped fine, thankfully.

Beautiful white and pink flowers

A number of people have told me that I should take this further with my GP but really this is as much my responsibility in my eyes. Every time I get prescribed medication I have always reminded my GP and when I ask the pharmacist for over the counter medication I always tell him too. When I get home with any new medication I always do a final check before taking anything.

This time I did none of those things, I was prescribed medication and I came home and took it. It is a lesson for me to never left my guard up. My recovery is my responsibility.

The funny thing is that when the physical pain starting easing up it was awful. When I was in physical pain it took my attention away from  my emotional pain. When the physical pain was gone then I started having to face what I was feeling emotionally. It reminded me of when I used to cut myself to get away from what I was feeling.

It’s been 7+ weeks since my miscarriage and things are a lot easier now. For the first few weeks it was such a roller-coaster of pain and tears. I did write about my miscarriage on my parenting blog 10 days after it happened, but I couldn’t quite get the courage or strength to share about it here too until now.


Here are some of the things that helped me to get through this awful experience sober (or mostly anyway):

  • Talking about my feelings with my husband, mom, sisters and close girlfriends.
  • Writing – both on my blog and in my journal.
  • Being kind to myself – avoiding negative self talk and being loving towards myself.
  • Resting and allowing myself to be sad. Letting myself cry when I felt overwhelmed.
  • Having a session with my counselor when I got out of hospital.
  • Remembering that this is a process and my healing won’t be in a straight line.
  • Allowing myself to grieve for my lost baby.

There are still so many moments of sadness and lots of tears. I can hardly think about what happened without shedding some tears.

Life is going to throw curve balls and even in long term recovery there will be tough moments. Being clean doesn’t mean that things are always going to be easy, in fact some of the hard moments are really intense, but I don’t need drugs or alcohol to blot them out. I can face them and I can get through it in one piece.

What hard things have you had to face in recovery?

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Sticking Together Through Easy Riding and Bumpy Roads

Getting into a relationship is an exciting, butterfly spamming experience that will begin setting you up for the rest of your life. You will have no doubt gone through an endless number of relationships, from innocent schoolyard hand holding to your first serious experiences as a teenager, to university flings and then, now you are older, to your first forays into the world of an adult relationship.

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You will also, at some point, experienced heartache. This could be for any number of reasons. But some of these reasons can include immaturity, you and your previous partner wanting wholly different things, or merely just coming to the end of some finding-yourself experiment.

You will have loved and laughed and learned. As you grow older, the need to be with someone is something that slips into everybody’s mind. When you find this person, you will realise sooner rather than later that this is the person you want to be with without caring about what anybody else may think. You will accept all their faults and stand by them throughout everything that comes your way. You will stop being an I and instead become We.

Because of this, you both need to work together to hold on to one another, no matter if the road ahead looks fraught with challenges, or even if things seem to be going exceptionally well.

YOUR PROBLEMS ARE OUR PROBLEMS

Continual support for your partner throughout thick and thin is essential for fostering a relationship built on trust and transparency where you are open about anything and everything. This will allow you both to avoid any unfortunate surprises as well as feel comfortable in discussing any issues that you may have.

And these problems can range from minute issues such as the way you cook your eggs to something further, something more damaging that, if not discussed openly can have ruinous effects on your relationship. This can include things such as addictions, anxieties, doubts, and anything else that if not talked about can breed distrust and only cause further problems later on.

In situations such as this and as terrifying a prospect as discussing your supposed faults and issues with your partner, you will feel better receiving support for it all once it is said and done. Furthermore, while there is a large chance that your partner may decide it is not for them – through no fault of their own, some people just react like that – at least it will save you both further heartache down the line.

If they do decide to leave, then you should at least hope to still have their support in helping you change for the better. If not, then it is for the best you have both decided to move on. In relationships, there is no such thing as an isolated problem, and no one person is an island. However, hiding these problems from your partner will only exacerbate the issue later on.




TOGETHER WHATEVER

The fact that we can travel far and wide in the modern world has granted people the opportunity to meet anybody, anywhere and perhaps even fall in love with them. It is becoming something of a romantic tale that two people meet while in a different country, experience all the wonders of the word together and then, at the airport at the end of it all, have to say goodbye.

Long distance can be a tough thing to tackle. However, if you can make it work, then it will build a stronger relationship that is sure to last a lifetime. Before embarking on something that will change the course of your life though, you need to ensure that you can handle living together.

Visiting your partner’s country and living with them for a time can be something that will make or break your future. You will learn more about each other and be able to understand what cohabitation is like. From here, you will be able to work out any issues in the relationship and move forward. Or, you will realise that it is perhaps just not meant to be and go home.

If you do realise that this person is seriously the one, then you will eventually want to look into one of you staying permanently in the other’s home country. Those with dual citizenship for both your and their country will find these easy. However, those without it can look into more information on spouse visas which will give you everything you need regarding the transition from old home to new.

FROM DISAPPOINTMENT BLOOMS HOPE

Every couple will at some point in their lives suffer a disappointment that maybe came out of nowhere and it seems that everything is tumbling toward a downward spiral that looks impossible to recover from. This disappointment can stem from the inability to conceive, being denied a loan to buy a house and start the next stage of your life, or getting promotions at work or looking for a new job.

When this disappointment does strike, it is only natural to believe that things will only get worse. However, no matter how bleak and grim your situation may seem at the minute, it is essential that you keep your chin up and continue moving forward.

As bad as things can get, believing that things can, and will, only get better is vital to building on this disappointment and striving towards improving your situation. Taking on a positive attitude may seem impossible in any depressing situation, but letting this disappointment consume you will only make things worse, even if you felt they wouldn’t get any worse.

Understanding that your disappointment will bloom hope is the first step to making things better. While this may take time, it will pay great dividends in the long-term. No matter what the disappointment may be, looking towards ways in which you can change your situation, as opposed to wallowing in self-pity, will make the transition easier than you might have expected. You can’t predict what will happen in your life, so assuming that there is no light at the end of the tunnel is counterproductive.  Things will get better, but only if you and your partner make an effort to improve them.




CLEAN SAILING

There will be tough times in your relationship, but there will also be times where everything is perfect. These are the times where food tastes sweeter, the sky is bluer, and you hit every green light on the way to work. Life, in a word, is excellent.

And during these times you will have an extra spring in your step. You won’t fight with your partner over insignificant issues, you will look to support them in everything and be supported in return, and it feels as if you have developed a bond that no one can break.

However, as blissful as this may be, it can also lead to complacency. Just because everything is peachy and you find yourself sailing over calm waters with not a cloud in sight doesn’t mean you can begin to neglect the things that made your relationship as picturesque as it became.

A lot of couples fall into the trap of the routine. They become so comfortable in their day-to-day that they forget what ignited the spark to begin with. To avoid this, ensure that you both keep things fresh. It is not up to one individual, but both of you. Treat each other randomly throughout the week or month, surprise the other with a trip or dinner reservation. Whisk them away without telling them where you are going (not in a kidnap-y way, though) and keep things fresh.

A strong relationship takes work and don’t assume that just because you are both happy that you can afford to ease the speed. Couples will naturally lose much of the passion that was first apparent when you got together, you have to keep striving to deliver that passion, and live happily ever after.

EASY RIDES, BUMPY ROADS

It is (mostly) impossible to live out your lives together without having little disagreements every now and again. But as long as the good times outweigh the bad, then you will both continue to enjoy your time together and start a family, buy a house, and grow old together and retire to some sandy shore where you can watch the sunset every night from your balcony.

As long as you both continue to support each other through both thick and thin you needn’t worry about further problems arising between the two of you. But life is tough and often unfair, there is no predicting what might happen in the future and so it is up to the both of you to seek solutions to fix any of life’s problems together.

Share your doubts and your worries, discuss them like adults and fight for your relationship, without this fight, then you may discover yourselves drifting apart, cooking up resentment for any legitimate or sometimes imagined slights. A healthy and strong relationship can weather any storm, and you both want to be happy, and each other to be happy, too. Do everything you can to make this a reality, and go forth into the world together.

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Feeling Like ‘You’ Again After Overcoming Addiction

Addiction is hard on the body, and in turn is hard on our looks. Once you make it through to the other side, you’re not the same person you were when you started either mentally or physically- and so finding ‘you’ again isn’t always something that comes easy. When you have an addiction this often comes ahead of anything else, including your health and appearance, and so spending time and effort on yourself again once you’re clean and sober might take some adjusting to. However, doing so can actually be very beneficial. Of course there’s more to a person than their outside appearance, but the way you look can really affect your self esteem and confidence. Feeling like yourself again after being detached from that for a while can be a nice feeling and it’s good for you both physically and mentally. Here’s how you can get back to being yourself.

Photo source

General Health

It might have been a while since you visited the doctor and there could be symptoms you were either ignoring or didn’t’ notice due to your addiction. If you’re a woman, you should book in for a smear test if you need one. Since alcohol has been linked to skin cancer (as well as drugs on a less direct level just as they weaken the immune system) you could book into a skin clinic if you have any concerns. Moles that have appeared or changed in shape or size are reasons to be checked out. Have your GP check your weight, blood pressure and blood sugar and make sure things are in check- if not, they can advise you about what you need to do to get these things in order. If you have been using needles or having unsafe sex, a blanket blood and sexual health test will help to give you peace of mind or let you know what kinds of treatments you need. Once you’re healthy and well again, you’ll be feeling much more like yourself.




Hair, Skin and Teeth

Addiction, particularly those that involve physical dependence such as substance abuse tend to cause issues with skin, hair and teeth. This is partially due to the addiction meaning you don’t take as good care of yourself and your maintenance regimes can slip, and they can also be a direct result of the drink or drugs. Alcohol for example is full of sugar and can cause tooth decay, and the toxins in both drink and drugs can lead to breakouts, dull skin and unhealthy hair. After addiction, take steps to put these things right. You could go to a beauty salon and have a facial and have them recommend some products. Visit a dentist about your oral health and look into cosmetic work if you need it. Go to a hairdresser and have them give you a cut and colour that suits you and makes the most of your locks. Just these things alone can massively improve your appearance and self esteem.




Do Things You Enjoy

Finally, a big part of what makes you ‘you’ is your hobbies and interests. These were likely put on hold when you were caught by addiction but are something now you can take up again. Not only will these be enjoyable but you could meet like minded people and it gives you something productive to do and takes your mind off your past addiction. It could be anything from dance to a sport to a craft or something else entirely, but throwing yourself into hobbies can prevent relapse and help you feel back like yourself again.

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