The Importance of Medically Supervised Addiction Treatment for Young Adults

The teenage years are really tough enough as it is with raging hormones, so when you add in a substance abuse problem it can become a complicated problem.

Many teens experiment with drugs or alcohol with little or no consequences at all, however there are a lot of teenagers that very quickly get stuck in the cycle of addiction. If you find out your teenager has been using drugs or alcohol you must take steps to find out the depth of the problem.

Because teenagers are not yet fully developed their views can be very limited. Very often teenagers simply cannot fully comprehend the severity of the consequences of their using and of their own behavior due to using.




For this reason if your teenager has a substance abuse problem it really is best to ensure you find an addiction treatment center that offers specialized addiction treatment for young adults.

When choosing a rehab for your teenager it is also important to choose a medically supervised addiction treatment program that will help to ensure the best possible outcome for your child.

Medically Supervised Addiction Treatment for Young Adults

Here are the reasons why a medically supervised addiction treatment program is so important for young adults:

A Medically Supervised Detox

Just to put it simply, withdrawal from certain drugs can be dangerous, even deadly which means a medical detox can mean the difference between life and death for your teenager.

There are many drugs that require detoxification, including alcohol, heroin and opiate related drugs, and certain prescription drugs such as Xanas, Oxycontin, Vicodin, and Hydrocodone. Withdrawal symptoms can have severe side effects which can be fatal if not properly treated.

Detoxing from these drugs may cause vomiting, trembling, nausea, suicidal thoughts, hallucinations, seizures, and comas.




Trained medical professionals can help to manage these life threatening symptoms by administering medication to wean the addict off of the drug, decrease physical withdrawal symptoms and prevent seizures.

Medical staff are on hand to check vital signs, evaluate mental and physical progress and provide support to the patient throughout the withdrawal process.

There are also other drugs that do not usually require a medical detox, these include marijuana, cocaine, and crystal methamphetamine. Withdrawal symptoms are not so severe ranging from a feeling of tiredness to extreme irritability and agitation.

Very often medical detox is given for these drugs for other reasons such as the patient feels they cannot stop without medical intervention, they have become psychotic from drug use and need a medical intervention, they feel they are a danger to themselves (suicidal) or perhaps they just don’t have anywhere else to go.

It is much safer for an addict to go through a medical detox than to try and attempt it from home, not just from the viewpoint of the physical and mental dangers associated with detox, but also because relapse is a lot more likely when attempting to detox without medical help.

When a drug addict goes back to using drugs during or just after withdrawal their tolerance is usually much lower making an overdose more likely.

Addiction and Dual Diagnosis

When a patient is diagnosed with a substance abuse problem and a mental health issue it is referred to as a dual diagnosis.

Common mental health disorders that occur in conjunction with addiction and substance abuse problems are:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Schizophrenia
  • Personality Disorders
  • Mood Disorders (such as Bipolar Disorder)

It may be that a drug addict starts to develop mental health issues when, after chronic drug use, the brain function alters.

Alternatively someone with mental health issues may attempt to treat the symptoms of their mental disorder by taking drugs. For example someone suffering from anxiety may smoke marijuana in an attempt to calm themselves and through prolonged use becomes addicted.




Regardless of which disorder occurs first it is essential that the addiction and the mental health disorder be treated at the same time. The symptoms and effects of the mental disorder can trigger and drive the addiction and vice versa.

At least 30% of people that are suffering with a substance abuse problem have mental health issues.

For these reasons it really is important for teenagers (and any other addict) to be treated at a medically supervised, dual diagnosis addiction center.

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Cocaine: Understanding How It Can Harm Your Nose

Cocaine addiction can cause significant long-term health effects that can cause problems to a recovering addict for many years to come. The nose can become damaged when cocaine is snorted by the nose.

The blood vessels in the nose are located close to the surface and allow the drug to rapidly be absorbed, causing a quick high. Unfortunately, because the blood vessels are located close to the surface, they can easily be damaged. A perforated septum can also occur. This happens when a hole is formed in the septum. This can cause nosebleeds, foul odors, infections and even a nasal collapse.

Cocaine nose damage

What damage can cocaine cause to the nose?

Many people do not realize that the nose is a complicated organ. When it is exposed to cocaine, a number of issues can arise, including:

* Nosebleeds (epistaxis)

* Infections of the sinus cavities and nasal passages

* A Perforated Septum

* Loss of the Sense of Smell

* A Collapse of the Nasal Passages

* A Nose Hole Caused by Cocaine Usage

Why Does Cocaine Cause These Issues?

The nose contains delicate tissues that are lined with blood vessels. These blood vessels are located very closely to the inner surfaces of the nose. One area that is particularly prone to these injuries is the septum. Cocaine causes the blood vessels in the nose to constrict. When this occurs, the blood flow to the area does not provide the nasal passages with enough oxygen. When these passages do not receive enough oxygen, the lining begins to die. When this occurs, the lining cannot support the cartilage. With continued use, cocaine can even cause the cartilage in the nose to die, resulting in a hole in the septum, known as a septal perforation. Once the septum becomes perforated, it can no longer support the nose structure and can cause a nasal collapse.

When the nasal passages do not receive enough oxygen, it can also be damaged and more prone to nosebleeds and infections. These infections can further damage the nasal tissues, resulting in an increased risk of a septal perforation.

Can It Be Treated?

The first step in treating these injuries is to stop using cocaine. This will help the blood vessels to recover, which will supply more oxygenated blood to the nasal lining. When blood flow is increased, the lining can begin healing itself. However, if you experience a septal perforation, quitting cocaine will not be enough.

A perforated septum is at an increased risk of infection. Additionally, the perforation will increase over time. If the perforation is not corrected, the appearance of the nose can change. When this occurs, your voice may be affected and you may be able to hear a whistle as air passes through the perforation.

Perforations of the septum that are crusted, have dried blood or are large, will need a perforated septum repair by a cosmetic surgeon. Once the repair is completed, the perforated septal defect will be almost invisible.

Septal perforation repair helps to restore airflow to through the sinus passages.

Before the perforation becomes large enough to cause a saddle nose, you should seek out treatment. This treatment is complex and should only be handled by a surgeon that has extensive nasal reconstruction experience.

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Why am I an Addict?

The question “Why am I an Addict?” is something I asked myself a lot in the early days of recovery.

Over time the answer has not miraculously been answered but that need to know has completely left me. I am not sure why it seemed so important at the time but for some reason I wanted an explanation.

Why am I an Addict?

What exactly causes addiction?

It could be that some people have a predisposition to addiction, maybe it runs in the family and it is hereditary. Some people believe we are weak-willed people that could have stopped but didn’t, that we crossed the “invisible line” and there is now no going back. Sometimes there is a traumatic event that sets off addiction but is that the cause of the addiction? Some people think it is due to lack of education or the bad environment you grow up in.

We have alcoholics and addicts in our family so perhaps there is something in the hereditary aspect.

Regarding the upbringing and lack of education well that certainly didn’t apply to me. My parents are amazing, they sent me to a good school and I had a wonderful and loving home life. So that wasn’t it.

I started drinking alcohol and smoking weed when I was 14. When I started drinking I found I could not stop, I drank to get drunk and I could not control myself. Yes it is true that I went through some very traumatic events at that age. It may have sparked my addiction off but I honestly don’t believe it was the cause of it.

I have memories of when I was about 5 years old. I would go to my mom and tell her I wasn’t well so she would give me Stopayne which has Codeine in it. I would also climb on top of the cupboard, open the “child-proof” medical box and drink it out the bottle. Something in me told me this was wrong which is why I did it in secret.

Stopayne has Codeine in it, the same narcotic component in Cocaine. In my twenties I tried Cocaine for the first time and in no time at all this became my drug of choice. You can read all about that in the ebook I wrote about my addiction.

These memories of my young days just prove to me that I have always been an addict. Maybe traumatic events moved it along a little faster but I do believe it was inevitable.

Do you ever ask yourself the question “Why am I an addict?”. Have you found any answers?

 

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