Drug Addiction, Health, and Life After

The word addiction comes from the Latin term “addictus” which means enslavement. The modern definition of drug addiction is the persistent and compulsive use of a harmful substance where the user is aware that the substances can harm his body. Anyone who has suffered from addiction understands why this word connotes slavery.

Addiction can influence the brain in three different ways. First, the person craves the object of addiction. Second, the person loses control of the way he uses the object of his craving. Third, the person continues to use it even if he knew that the substance has an adverse effect on his body.

Drug Addiction

There are many kinds of addiction that are seen in the world today. Some of them can be gambling, sex, internet, shopping, video games, plastic surgeries, and food addiction. This article focuses on drug addiction since many people may not understand how others become drug addicts.

Some people mistakenly thought that those who use drugs do not have willpower and moral principles. Some think that people who use drug can simply stop whenever they want. In truth, everything about addiction is not as simple as what others think. In terms of drug addiction, quitting is more than just strong will and good intentions. Drugs can change the way the brain is wired and quitting becomes harder than ever. Fortunately, many researchers have found treatments that can help people recover from their drug addiction.

Drug addiction needle

What Happens to the Brain after Taking Drugs?

Drugs are considered as chemicals. When a person puts these chemicals into his body through injecting, smoking, eating or inhaling them, they go directly to the brain’s communication system. These drugs normally manipulate the way the nerve cells send and receive information. For more information about drug addiction, click this link here.

These drugs work by imitating the chemical messengers of the brain and overstimulating the brain’s reward circuit. If a person feels good after taking a drug, he will continue using it even if the long-term effects are bad for his health. When a person takes drugs for the first time, the part of the brain called the nucleus accumbens is flooded with dopamine. Dopamine is a kind of neurotransmitter. When the brain releases dopamine in large amounts, it creates a feeling of reward and pleasure. Surges of dopamine can motivate a person to repeat a certain unhealthy behavior such as taking drugs.

More Drugs in the Long Run

The first time that a person takes a drug, it can be a free choice. When the drug is taken continuously, the brain will adapt by reducing the reward circuit response that it produces. This means that in the long run, the person will have to take more drugs to achieve the same high that they have experienced during their first time. They might even find the previous activities that they find pleasurable such as social activities, food or shopping to be lacking compared to drugs.

health after drugs running

Kinds of Drugs

There are a lot of drugs out there that can produce different effects on the body. Marijuana, hashish and cannabis substances can be inhaled, eaten, or smoked. They can give a feeling of euphoria. There are heightened feelings of auditory, taste, and visual perception, and exaggerated cravings for certain food in the middle of the night.

Spice, K2, and bath salts are a group of synthetic drugs that are mostly illegal. They can be prepared as an herbal tea and they can produce elevated moods, an extreme sense of euphoria, and increased blood pressure. Bath salts can alter the mind similar to the effects of cocaine and ecstasy.

Benzodiazepines, Hypnotics, and Barbiturates are used as depressants for the central nervous system. People are often addicted to them because they can produce a sense of relaxation. They can also be used as sedatives and to forget any stressful thoughts.

Cocaine, Methamphetamines and other stimulants can boost the energy of a person. They can promote increased alertness, behavior aggression and feelings of exhilaration. There are a lot more drugs in the market today such as inhalants, hallucinogens, club drugs, and painkillers with opium.

  

Rebuild Your Life   

When a person knows that he has an addiction and reaches out for help, then this is one of the bravest decisions that he will ever do in his life. Getting his life back in control after making a lot of bad choices requires courage and strength. You can get more information about how to rebuild your life with http://www.projectunbroken.com.

The first step is to visit your doctor. If your doctor does not specialize in drug treatment, ask for a referral. Go to a rehabilitation center if needed. Most people find that they are taking a drug to fulfill a psychological need during their childhood. Treatment can take months but recovery is a lifelong process.

While under treatment, the person can change his daily routine. He can build new social circles which are made up of people who are not into drugs. Avoid negative people who promote drug use. Overly emotional and stressful people can trigger drug cravings so one should also avoid them at all costs.

Life after Drugs

It is important to find a purpose before doing recovery. The person can set goals and expectations for himself. On top of that, damaged relationships can be rebuilt over time. One can start a new hobby and join recreational programs. One can also pursue education or getting a job. A healthy diet and good habits can develop over time. Maintenance and consistency is the key. Living a life that is not dependent on anything is bliss.

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My Booky Wook review

My Booky Wook ReviewI recently tried to read My Booky Wook by Russell Brand. I only came across it because it was given to me by someone that I regularly trade books with. Until I saw the book I have not known any about Russell Brand except for the fact that he dated Katy Perry for a while.

I have not watched any movies featuring Russell Brand and I have not watched any of his stand up comedian shows. After coming across his book I did briefly look at his Youtube channel, I watched half a video about Rene Zellweger’s face which I found mildly amusing but couldn’t be bothered to watch to the end.

What is My Booky Wook about?

So this book is about Russell Brand’s life, his sex and love addiction, his heroin addiction and just stories from his life.

What I liked about My Booky Wook

Russell Brand tells it how it is, he is honest about his addiction problems and doesn’t hide anything. When he shares about something that happened it is raw and brutal, which really gives some insight into how addiction really is.

What I disliked about My Booky Wook

Ok Russell, I am sorry because I feel like I am attacking you personally and that is the last thing I want to do to a fellow addict. Like you were honest in your book I will have to be honest here too. I did not like this book at all, in fact I couldn’t even finish reading it.

This book was badly written, the vocabulary was ridiculous for starters. Who uses words like that? Does anyone know what those words mean? The sentence structure and grammar was appalling. I am not a stupid person but I couldn’t even understand what was being said the majority of the time. I could only read about two pages at a time and even then I couldn’t understand what I had read.

My Booky Wook is distinctly British, if you are not British you will not understand what he is on about. I am not British and I was completely lost. There are footnotes to explain all the references but really I couldn’t be bother trying to follow.

The biggest issue I had with this book though is the way he portrays his stories. I am an addict and I know how we behave when we are in an unhealthy state of mind. We glorify everything, we glamorize things… make them into cool and fun “war stories”. This behavior came through very strongly for me. I am not a counselor and I really shouldn’t pass judgement here, but my feeling is that when Russell Brand wrote this book he was very much in the throes of addiction.




It appears the honesty that I first liked could just be a way of throwing his stuff out there, like in your face? A shock tactic of “look at me, I am crazy and wild”. Another character defect common in addicts in active addiction.

Nothing wrong with that really, anyone has the right to read a book. I just had the impression he was in recovery and that perhaps I would find reading the memoirs of another addict inspiring.

My Booky Wook by Russell Brand

What did My Booky Wook do for me?

It did nothing for me but leave me with a sick and uneasy feeling in my stomach. I’m glad this book was given to me, not as a gift but as a second hand trade. I would have been disappointed if I had spent money on this book.

Would I recommend this?

Nope I wouldn’t. However I must just share that I checked out the reviews and comments on Amazon, this book scored 3.8 stars out of 5. There were 317 reviews most of which were very positive. A lot of people found his book very entertaining and funny, they say it was brilliantly written?

Buy It Now

I love reading, it is one of my favorite things to do to relax. I especially love reading books by other addicts. The fact I couldn’t force myself to finish this book says a lot.

For me as a recovering addict, a person that takes my recovery very seriously I don’t recommend this. Addiction is black and white. It is life or death. Yes there have been some hilarious things happen in my life and yes I can laugh about it and I can probably get you to laugh too. BUT I won’t glorify what happened or glamorize it.

Once again, sorry Russell, I am sure you are a lovely chap and I wish you all the best with your journey. I just won’t be following it.

Have you read this book? Please leave a comment if you have any feedback or questions about this review. 

 

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Addiction Treatment for Recovery: The Start of my Journey

The start of my addiction treatment for recovery was a 3 week stay in a psychiatric ward.

I was still in denial and didn’t have a clue how much trouble I was in. I had blue eyes and a broken nose when I arrived there, compliments of an abusive relationship. I was covered in bruises. I believed I was a victim and had done nothing to deserve where I was in life.

Every addict will lay the blame an anything and everything but herself or himself. If we are in denial we can continue using. We can also blot out everything shameful we have done or been through by using more. And so the cycle continues…

Addiction Treatment for Recovery

Denial

During my stay there I was allowed out for a walk, giving me the perfect opportunity to find my dealer and acquire 2 grams of cocaine. On my return the staff saw immediately something was not right and tested me immediately. They considered kicking me out, but for some reason let me stay. They did make me go to my first 12 Step meeting the following day at the adjoining Addiction Clinc.

I went to the meeting and announced that I was in fact not an addict but the staff at the psychiatric ward thought I might be so I had to come join in. Sound crazy enough to you? Of course it is, I was completely delusional. What sane person leaves a psychiatric ward, takes drugs and comes back an hour later thinking this is normal?

Manipulation

On leaving the clinic I was advised by my psychiatrist to not have any mood or mind altering substances for the next 3 months. Looking back it is clear they were aware I had a serious problem. I considered this advice, to take or not to take as it pleases me. I didn’t use anything for a few days, which to me was hard core proof I didn’t have a problem. A few weeks later I managed to embarrass myself in public by getting so drunk I vomited and then fell out of a truck into my own vomit. I won’t go into too much detail on how that happened, you can use your imagination or you can read about that story and a good few more in my ebook.

Now having blue eyes and a broken nose once again did not sit well with my family that were concerned about me. They wanted me to go for addiction treatment. Once again I couldn’t figure out what all the fuss was about. I managed to convince them that I could get by with an outpatient program instead of being booked in anywhere.

This didn’t work very well for me. I continued to use and I failed every drug test. By the 3rd drug test I came to realise that I was on the verge of being kicked off the program and my family would not be pleased. Instead of telling my family I had been using I told them I was “struggling” and wanted to move out of my parents home into tertiary care, which is a home of safety. Then I told the clinic where I was doing the outpatient program that I was moving to a house of safety and could they please let me continue the program.

They allowed this and I am not sure how I managed to complete this program. I think a miscommunication between the 2 facilities must have occurred because I continued to use and neither facility tested me again.

Now I found myself living in a house of safety and trying to hide my using, not an easy task! One night I overdid, as of course I would. It was 20 minutes before our curfew when I had to be home. I was so drunk I could barely walk and high on cocaine. There was just no way I would be able to pull that off. Instead I texted the manager and told him I had “relapsed” and would contact them in the morning.

At this time I still had no concern about getting clean, it was all about manipulating everyone to leave me alone so I could continue using. I wasn’t an addict! I was just going through a wild phase right? You know, like every normal person does at some stage. The fact that this “wild phase” was going on for about 15 years didn’t really occur to me.

I had to try and get myself out of this mess without my family writing me off. I called my parents and the owner of the house of safety and said I was “ready to get clean, what must I do?”. I thought perhaps acting like I would do whatever needed to be done and following their instructions (for a little while at least) would get me some breathing space while I figured out what to do.

I was told to go into Secondary Care treatment. I happily collected my bags and off I went. Only upon signing the contract upon arrival did I get the shock of my life realizing it was a minimum 3 month stay. What happened to the 28 days thing I had heard about? Oh well, I had to do it because I didn’t really have much choice did I?

Walking the Walk & Talking the Talk

My plan at this stage was to do the recovery act for the 3 months, make it out the other side and then carry on with my life as I felt fit. For about a month I did just this. I shared in groups, I went to AA meetings and I did everything asked of me. I said what I thought they wanted to hear and I followed every suggestion. Not because I wanted to get clean, but because I honestly believed there truly was some big mistake. This wasn’t the place for me, I was misunderstood.

Slowly things must have started to sink in. All that therapy, all those groups and meetings…

Breaking through the Denial

About 6 weeks into treatment I was sitting writing an assignment and I realized a few things:

  • I am an addict!
  • I want to be clean
  • I have a Higher Power and it is working in my life
  • I have been working this program (for a little while at least, certainly not from the start)
  • I feel good, not great but good

What confused me is that I can’t pinpoint the moment something in me had changed. I realised at that moment that I knew I was an addict, but it is not a realization I had that second. I had known it for a while. When did it change?

Where did this Higher Power come from, what is it and how can I believe in God when I am not religious?

What on earth happened?

I have been clean since 02 August 2008 when I arrived at the Secondary Care rehab. I have never touched another mood or mind altering substance and that is a miracle.

I really believe that being in treatment for those 6 weeks, having recovery shoved down my throat made the change happen in me. Without that I doubt anything could have saved me. It might sound crazy but I actually enjoyed rehab, it was the first time in many years I did something for myself, something I could be proud of.

If you are an addict or alcoholic in active addiction, please do yourself a favour and book yourself in for treatment. It can be the life-changing event you need to save your life.

I am sure every addict is scared of treatment but it can be a wonderful experience. I will share more in-depth at some stage about my experiences in treatment.

I hope you enjoyed reading this and got something of value from it, please leave a comment below!

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Why am I an Addict?

The question “Why am I an Addict?” is something I asked myself a lot in the early days of recovery.

Over time the answer has not miraculously been answered but that need to know has completely left me. I am not sure why it seemed so important at the time but for some reason I wanted an explanation.

Why am I an Addict?

What exactly causes addiction?

It could be that some people have a predisposition to addiction, maybe it runs in the family and it is hereditary. Some people believe we are weak-willed people that could have stopped but didn’t, that we crossed the “invisible line” and there is now no going back. Sometimes there is a traumatic event that sets off addiction but is that the cause of the addiction? Some people think it is due to lack of education or the bad environment you grow up in.

We have alcoholics and addicts in our family so perhaps there is something in the hereditary aspect.

Regarding the upbringing and lack of education well that certainly didn’t apply to me. My parents are amazing, they sent me to a good school and I had a wonderful and loving home life. So that wasn’t it.

I started drinking alcohol and smoking weed when I was 14. When I started drinking I found I could not stop, I drank to get drunk and I could not control myself. Yes it is true that I went through some very traumatic events at that age. It may have sparked my addiction off but I honestly don’t believe it was the cause of it.

I have memories of when I was about 5 years old. I would go to my mom and tell her I wasn’t well so she would give me Stopayne which has Codeine in it. I would also climb on top of the cupboard, open the “child-proof” medical box and drink it out the bottle. Something in me told me this was wrong which is why I did it in secret.

Stopayne has Codeine in it, the same narcotic component in Cocaine. In my twenties I tried Cocaine for the first time and in no time at all this became my drug of choice. You can read all about that in the ebook I wrote about my addiction.

These memories of my young days just prove to me that I have always been an addict. Maybe traumatic events moved it along a little faster but I do believe it was inevitable.

Do you ever ask yourself the question “Why am I an addict?”. Have you found any answers?

 

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